ONLINE WORKSHOP: 

Date And Time

Sun, 5 April 2020

14:30 – 15:30 BST

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/british-english-pronunciation-free-online-workshop-mypronunciationcouk-tickets-101198623808?aff=hp

 

Basic Course Structure

Course content

International Phonetic Alphabet

Understanding the use of vocal cords, shaping of mouth and lips

Vowels: short vowels, long vowels, diphthong vowels, triphthong vowels

Consonants: Plosives, fricatives, affricates, nasals

Connected speech: Use of syllables, semi-vowels, combining various vowel and consonant sounds

 

Lesson Structure for Beginner Students (40 minutes)

Advanced

Time

Warm-up

5 minutes

Study basic phonemes

15 minutes

Study connected speech (shadowing)

10 minutes

Sentence practice

10 minutes

Approx 12-15 lessons required to complete basic course. Number of lesson varies depending on student’s ability.

 

Lesson Structure for Advanced Students (40 minutes)

Beginner

Time

Warm-up

5 minutes

Review basic phonemes

5 minutes

Review connected speech (shadowing)

10 minutes

Dictation

5 minutes

Reading & speech practice

15 minutes

Date & time: Saturday, 21st March 2020, 15:00~16:30

Location: Maida Vale Library (The workshop will be held in a privately reserved room.)

IMPORTANT CHANGES **Due to the current health crisis, this event has will be held ONLINE ONLY via the Zoom Video Conference Platform (software available for free from zoom.us). Anyone who has already purchased tickets before these changes were made has the option to receive a refund.**

Participation fee: £15 per person (student discount available)

British English pronunciation, accent reduction & elocution for students and professionals. This workshop is for anyone who would like to learn to speak with a clear British English accent. Whether you are a student giving presentations or a business professional involved in high stakes negotiations, communicating clearly and effectively is essential whatever the situation. Just making a few minimal changes to the way you pronounce certain words can make a big difference in the impression you leave with others. Join us for the next pronunciation workshop on Match 21st (Sat) 2020 in Maida Vale, London.

Details on the Eventbrite website. Seating is extremely limited. Purchase in advance is highly recommended.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/british-english-pronunciation-workshop-mypronunciationcouk-tickets-97971512431?aff=hp

This course aims to help students develop natural English pronunciation using accelerated learning techniques and visual aids.

Understanding how your brain functions and how new experiences establish neural links is an essential part to improvement. Once these neural pathways have been formed they must be cultivated and strengthened.

Step 1 

It all starts with the international phonetic alphabet. The English alphabet is not a phonetic script and therefore not an accurate guide for pronunciation. However, the international phonetic alphabet helps us distinguish and identify the different phonemes that exist in the English language. While the English alphabet only has 5 vowels, in fact more than 20 vowel sounds exist including monophthongs, diphthongs and long vowels.

Step 2

Tune your ears. The human brain requires constant practice and reinforcement to adapt to something new. Comparing similar different sounds within the context of various situations helps the brain establish and reinforce the neural pathways to become better adept at being able to identify the small details that often non native speakers miss. 

For example, the short vowel // and the short vowel // sound very similar but they are in fact different. Initially students may perceive both sounds to be almost identical. However, constant reinforcement by comparing these two sounds in the context of different syllables and vocabulary will help the brain become accustomed to these sounds.


Step 3

Reinforcement in the real world. A pronunciation course and structure can only provide students with the essential tools, knowledge and groundwork. The knowledge gained within the classroom must then be applied in the real world. 

  • Listen to natural spoken English as much as possible.
  • Observe the facial movements and breathing of native English speakers.
  • Try and compare yourself and adapt. Remember, practice makes perfect.

International phonetic alphabet: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/mypronunciaton/ 

Within the UK, many different accents and dialects exist. Received pronunciation is often referred to as the Queen’s English or BBC English which is estimated to be spoken by approximately 2% of the British population.

Some would argue that RP is outdated but this couldn't be further from the truth. In fact many aspiring British actors learn RP at acting school and it is spoken by many famous and notable people within the UK. Checkout these Pinterest links to get an idea of British people who speak RP in some form or another. For any speaker of RP who might come across as a bit pompous, this could be due to their use of voice inflection and intonation rather than the accent itself. 

Some would also make a distinction between traditional, upper, neutral and modern RP. For example, perhaps the younger members of the royal family such as Prince William could be considered to speak with a more modern RP accent. 

There is no "correct way" to speak English, however received pronunciation would be suitable for non-native English speakers since it is clear and tends to be easily understood by people around the world. Those who need to communicate clearly and effectively such as diplomats, business men, interpreters and scientists would probably benefit from learning RP. 

More information about what Received Pronunciation is can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Received_Pronunciation

 

 

 

 

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